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A new navigation device that will enable warfighters to better shoot, move and communicate in a GPS degraded environment, could replace the legacy handheld Defense Advanced GPS Receiver (DAGR) used by the US Army. The Army has put the new system under field testing in reconnaissance and fire missions in a variety of threat scenarios, to understand its performance in a realistic operational environment. 

The Dismounted Assured Positioning, Navigation, and Timing System (DAPS) 

will provide dismounted leaders Assured PNT capability in GPS-degraded and -denied environments by providing GPS integrity and non-GPS sensor augmentation as a nested capability within the Assured PNTA-PNT Ground Domain.

DAPS replaces the DAGR and/or commercial GPS on the Nett Warrior Ensemble’s End User Device (EUD), i.e., Smartphone for the Dismounted Leader. 

Airborne infantry and artillery soldiers provided feedback during night operations across rough and varied terrain. Scenarios involved night vision goggles, nuclear, biological and chemical masks, Stryker infantry carrier vehicles, etc.

DAPS will also alert the Dismounted Leader when the GPS solution may not meet the mission and or situational needs. It is expected to leverage multiple sensors and timing sources in order to produce the best PNT solution possible within the operational environment.

Unlike vehicles, which have the real estate and vehicle power to accommodate robust sensor and antenna suites, DAPS has significant size, weight, and power (SWaP) constraints. Dismounted Leaders, already physically burdened with heavy equipment loads, cannot accept additional power and weight burdens. The DAPS size and weight objective is to be less than that of the current DAGR.

DAPS uses an iterative Development Operations (DevOps) approach to achieving Assured PNT accuracy, access, and integrity requirements, according to insidegnss.com.