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Cybersecurity for medical devices is critical in retaining the trust consumers place in health care companies for how the technology is used, and how health information is protected. While manufacturers can ensure a high level of safety through testing, the security of connected devices (IoT) – from pacemakers to monitoring devices – remains a growing and moving target.

The University of Minnesota has established a new Center for Medical Device Cybersecurity (CMDC). The center will foster university-industry-government collaborations to ensure that medical devices are both safe and secure from the growing number of cybersecurity threats.

The CMDC was formed in response to a request from members of the medical device manufacturing industry in the US to form a collaborative hub for discovery, outreach, and workforce training in the emerging device security field. The center will focus on developing new research, technologies, to address potential cybersecurity threats.

The new center builds on expertise from institutes and centers across the University in both the medical device and cybersecurity space. 

The CMDC will be housed within the Technological Leadership Institute (TLI), an interdisciplinary center within the College of Science and Engineering. The CMDC is founded and funded in large part by five U.S. leading health industry companies. 

“By partnering with academic organizations, industry experts, and our peers we can help formulate policies, regulatory proposals and state-of-the-art testing so that we not only support the long-term success of secure medical devices, but also protect the patients who rely on medical devices for their care therapies,” said Allison Miller, chief information security officer for Optum, one of the founder companies, according to twin-cities.umn.edu.