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Meta, IBM and dozens of startups and researchers formed an alliance meant to defend a more open and collaborative artificial intelligence development, while leaving out OpenAI and Google.

This philosophical debate is now the central battleground for the future of artificial intelligence, with mounting concern that OpenAI and Google will create a dangerous monopoly over this technology that could become increasingly crucial to our everyday lives. IBM CEO Arvind Krishna said in the statement announcing the AI Alliance that this is a pivotal moment in defining the future of artificial intelligence.

According to Techxplore, both Google and OpenAI defend a closed system for large language models, viewing themselves as “the AI adult in the room” with total control of the technology to ensure that it is deployed ethically and responsibly.

Open-source advocates opposing them argue that sharing artificial intelligence technology can both spur innovation and ensure that not one company or actor gets dangerously ahead. Recent turmoil in OpenAI with the firing of Sam Altman and the consequent strengthening of Microsoft’s role in the industry only deepened misgivings about one company playing such an outsize role in providing artificial intelligence.

One of today’s biggest believers in the open-source model is Facebook’s parent company Meta, which argues against keeping artificial intelligence’s future hidden in the labs of a few select tech giants. Unlike ChatGPT, Meta’s LLaMA models were made easily available for researchers and startups to access, play and tinker with, and even perfect.

Nick Clegg, president of global affairs at Meta, has stated: “We believe it’s better when AI is developed openly—more people can access the benefits, build innovative products and work on safety.”

This alliance includes IBM, Meta, Intel, and NASA, along with about 50 other companies and organizations. OpenAI and Google are not among the founding members.