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The Georgia State University has developed a new and innovative technology for artificial vision, which utilizes a new architecture to enhance color recognition on a micro level.

In a recent paper published in the scientific journal ACS Nano, researchers write that this represents the first step towards developing a camera specifically for micro-robots. This research shows how the basic principle of the technology works, and how the technique can be used in the future to develop new image sensors with a minimal size. Their research focused on the development of a biomimetic artificial vision system that mimics biochemical processes with nanotechnology.

It is estimated that about 80% of the information we absorb during the course of a day comes from our vision. The same holds true for the industries of medical, research, and manufacturing. Thus, the researchers plan to develop a micro-scale camera for microrobots to move more easily in narrow spaces – technology that could be used for medical diagnosis, environmental studies, industry and manufacturing, archeology, and much more. In short, it is a biomimetic ‘electronic eye’, which detects color fully (color recognition is critical for vision), according to news.gsu.edu.

Specifically, the researchers developed a unique stacking technique for hardware design. An enhanced color sensing system is provided by the use of van der Waals semiconductor connections, which improve color recognition. The van der Waals semiconductor-powered vertical color sensing structure can, therefore, offer precise color recognition capability that simplifies the design of optical lenses for artificial vision systems. According to the researchers, the novel design architecture was made possible thanks to a new strategy for three-dimensional integration, in contrast to conventional microelectronics layouts. Findings from the researchers are an important step towards the development of biomimetic electronic eyes and their application in our future devices.