USMC Demonstrates Manned-Unmanned Teaming

The US Navy’s MQ-8C Fire Scout uncrewed helicopter developed by Northrop Grumman. Photo by US Navy, commons.wikimedia.org
The US Navy’s MQ-8C Fire Scout uncrewed helicopter developed by Northrop Grumman. Photo by US Navy, commons.wikimedia.org

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Collaboration between man and machine is one way of reducing the risks among staff, automating complex tasks and coordinating human and machine factors in real-time. By combining manned and unmanned players, military missions can be carried out in complete coordination between both parties.

Marine Corps helicopters demonstrated manned-unmanned teaming capabilities in a special exercise with the US Navy in California recently. Participating in the exercise were marines from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron One (VMX-1), as well as sailors from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 (HSC-23). For the demonstration, the Navy-Marine Corps team used a UH-1Y Venom and an AH-1Z Viper helicopters, as well as an unmanned MQ-8C Fire Scout.

While the manned helicopters conducted the actual attacks, the unmanned MQ-8C Fire Scout helicopter assisted in locating targets and coordinating strikes throughout the exercise.

According to naval-technology.com, by using this method, the United States Armed Forces coordinated strikes and planned missions while keeping in close communication with manned and unmanned aircraft.