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A new shield offers multi-hit protection from armor-piercing rifle bullets and is easily carried by a single armed shield operator. The shield is constructed from an advanced hybrid ceramic and polyethylene armor composite.

Baker Ballistics teamed up with Advanced Accuracy Solutions (AAS) to produce a combination of its MRAPS-IV-XL (mobile rifle armor protective shield level four, extra large) and AAS’ The Reaper shield support (TRSS) system. The Reaper support system is mounted in a backpack, enabling an operator to position a heavy shield hands free by suspending the shield in front of the operator, according to policemag.com.

Baker Ballistics’ CEO Rick Armellino says the Reaper transfers the weight of the shield to the operator’s shoulder and hips, greatly increasing the amount of protection the operator can carry and substantially reducing muscle fatigue. He adds the system’s hydraulics keep the shield in place so that it is weight neutral.

The new Ballistic ROC effectively captures common handgun bullets, preserving them for evidence while preventing damage to the Level IV shield immediately behind. When positioned over the ceramics, it contains hazardous projectile and ceramic fragments that splash off the hard ceramic surface during bullet impacts, protecting personnel from injury caused by fragmentation.

“We’ve designed the Ballistic ROC so it will instantly drop down to protect the operator’s legs, including the knees,” Armellino says. “If necessary the operator simply squats and the Ballistic ROC, in conjunction with the primary MRAPS-IV-XL shield, provides head-to-toe coverage from assailants firing handgun and shotgun rounds low, including common rifle rounds first deflected off the floor or ground.”

Armellino says the MRAPS-IV-XL and The Reaper combination are easier to use and more versatile than other Level IV portable rifle protection systems on the market. Another advantage of The Reaper-MRAPS IV-XL system is it can be easily and rapidly deployed. Armellino says an operator can put on the system in less than a minute without any help.